26 Different Types of Lavender Plants

Growing lavender is rewarding, relaxing, and satisfying.

Not only do these beautiful plants look great in any space, but their sweet fragrance and striking purple-blue flowers make them a joy to have around.

Lavender-plant

If you’ve ever grown lavender before, you’ll know just how hardy and easy to grow it is. In fact, it’s one of the most common herbs grown as a home garden plant due to its versatility and ease of maintenance.

Not only does it grow well in a pot or directly in the ground, but it thrives in almost any conditions except for humidity (which isn’t so much a problem as it is a simple precaution).

There are many different varieties of lavender plants available on the market today. Some have more purple hues than others, while some feature blue tones rather than pink ones.

The types of lavender plants can determine the origin, resistance, and appearance of the plant you want to maintain.

Choosing Lavender plants that suit your planting purpose is needed before buying Lavender.

Some things you can consider before buying Lavender include:

Hardiness

Lavender can grow well in zones 5 to 8. Certain varieties can grow in zones 9 and 10. Other varieties can grow in zones 3 and 4 with added protection.

Frost hardiness is a consideration, but humidity also needs to be considered. Lavender is not resistant to high humidity.

In addition to the USDA horticultural zone map, you can also use the United States Plant Heat Zone Map that the American horticultural society has developed.

The United States Plant Heat Zone Map divides the country’s territory into twelve heat zones.

You can use both maps (USDA horticulture and Hot zone map) to get the type of Lavender you want to grow.

Flowering Stem Length

For those of you who intend to sell lavender plants, you need to consider the length of the flowering stems, the scent of Lavender, and the color of the flowers.

The length of the flower stem is so essential to the florist that it usually costs more for a longer size.

Plant height

If you intend to keep Lavender as a hedge, the height of the foliage is more important than the flowering stems.

Plants like the pink ‘Jean Davis,’ the compact ‘Munstead,’ or the ‘Blue Dwarf’, which can reach 12 inches, may be an option.

Plants with the name nana, the botanical Latin term for ‘dwarf’, can be your choice for a more dwarf plant.

Plants L. multifida, L. x intermedia ‘Grappenhall’ dark blue-purple blooms that can reach 40 inches can be your choice for larger plants.

Foliage Color and Texture

There are several different leaf colors and textures that you can choose from depending on the Lavender variety, such as gray-green, blue-green, gray-white, or jagged leaf textures.

There are several varieties of Lavender that you can choose from, including:

  • L. stoechas has gray-green leaves.
  • L.a.’Mrs. Grey’ has gray and white leaves.
  • L. viridis green leaves with a combination of cream flowers.
  • L.lanata ‘Boiss’ has a hairy leaf texture.
  • L.dentata has deep, fragrant green leaves with scalloped texture at the edges.

Flower

Flower color is vital if you want to keep this plant as an ornament at home. In the garden, white or pink is a different color from Lavender in general that you can choose.

If you want to dry flowers for a bouquet in winter, there are some rich lavender options to consider, including:

  • L.a. ‘Hidcote’.
  • L.x. Intermedia ‘Dutch’.

 If you don’t care about color, but do care about the length of the flowering stems, you can choose ‘Grosso’ lavender or ‘Provence’ lavender.

Flowering Period

Lavender usually blooms in the summer. But don’t expect much from young plants that are still growing in their first year.

The Lavender will have a nice, eye-catching appearance in the second year. If you are concerned with blooming time, the choice of L.a. ‘Tucker’s Early Purple’ is an early-blooming variety.

If you want a plant with a second strong growth in the fall, choose L. angustifolia ‘Irene Doyle’ (or ‘Two Seasons’), ‘Sharon Roberts’, and ‘Buena Vista.’

Types of Lavenders by Bloom Color – Richest Purples

Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’

Originating: Hidcote Manor, France, early 1920s.

Flower Appearance: dark blue

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 6–8 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 12–20 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 20–24 inches

Regional Zone: 5–9

The popularity of ‘Hidcote’ has resulted in several different seed-raised plants of the natural kind. The characteristics above are a description of the natural species.

‘Imperial Gem’

Imperial-Gem

Originating: Norfolk Lavender, Norfolk, England, 1960s.

Flower Appearance: dark blue

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 10–14 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: 5–9

‘Imperial Gem’ is quite similar to the true ‘Hidcote’ cultivar but has larger flower heads.

‘Hidcote Superior’

Hidcode-Superior

Originating: Jelitto Perennial Seeds, Schwarmstedt, Germany, 2002

Flower Appearance: dark purple

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 6–8 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 20–24 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 24 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

One of the lavenders with the darkest blooms is ‘Hidcote Superior.’

‘Purple Bouquet’

Purple-bouquet-Lavender

Originating: Sunshine Herb Farm, Tenino, Washington, 2006

Flower Appearance: dark purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 12–15 inches

Bloom: twice starting in early summer

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

Purple Bouquet’s tall, dark stems make it an excellent choice for bouquets or crafts.

‘Impress Purple’

Impress Purple

Originating: France via New Zealand, 1983; named by Peter Smale, Redbank Research Centre, New Zealand, 1994.

Flower Appearance: purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 20–24 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 30–36 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 36–42 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Impress Purple’ is ideal for fresh bouquets. When held up to the sun, the dusty purple flower spikes appear dusted with silver.

Types of Lavenders by Bloom Color – Darkest Blues

‘Betty’s Blue’

Bettys-blues-lavender

Originating: Nichols Garden Nursery, Albany,Oregon, 1998

Flower Appearance: dark blue

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 6–8 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

Because of its deep blue hue and tight flower heads, ‘Betty’s Blue’ is an excellent choice for crafts.

‘Blue Cushion’

Blue Cushion

also sold as ‘Schola’

Originating: Blooms of Bressingham, Suffolk,England, 1992

Flower Appearance: light blue

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 8–10 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 18–24 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 24 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

This is a little cultivar that would be ideal for a container.

‘Thumbelina Leigh’

Thumbelina Leigh

Originating: Elsie and Brian Hall, Blenheim, New Zealand, mid-1990s

Flower Appearance: dark violet

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 4–6 inches

Bloom: once in late spring

Height: 20–24 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 24–30 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

This type is ideal for containers due to its compact growth habit and short spikes. Because it is patented, commercial propagation is prohibited.

‘Violet Intrigue’

Violet Intrigue

Originating: Virginia McNaughton and Dennis Matthews, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2002

Flower Appearance: dark violet

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 10–12 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 30–36 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

This unique cultivar is highly valued for its outstanding bloom quality and habit.

Also, read about how to plant, grow and care for lavender.

Types of Lavenders by Bloom Color – Pinks

‘Coconut Ice’

Coconut-ice-lavender

Originating: Virginia McNaughton, Lavender Downs, West Melton, New Zealand, 1997

Flower Appearance: pink

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 10–12 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Coconut Ice’, like ‘Melissa,’ produces both pink and white flowers on the same flower head; however, the pink flowers are a bit darker.

‘Hidcote Pink’

Hidcote Pink lavender

Originating: Major Lawrence Johnston, Hidcote Manor, Gloucester, England, before 1957

(Johnston brought Hidcote to England from

France in the 1920s)

Flower Appearance: light pink

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 6–8 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 30–36 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Hidcote Pink’ has a rich, sweet smell and is excellent for cooking.

‘Little Lottie’

Little Lottie

also sold as ‘Clarmo’

Originating: Norfolk Lavender, Norfolk, England, 1998

Flower Appearance: light pink

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 6–8 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 20–24 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 24–30 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Little Lottie’ is a fragrant herb that is excellent for cooking.

‘Melissa’

Melissa-lavender

Originating: Van Hevelingen Herb Nursery, Newburg, Oregon, 1994

Flower Appearance: light pink

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 8–10 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Melissa’ is frequently used in cooking. Some say it has a peppery flavor, making it a wonderful choice for savory recipes.

‘Miss Katherine’

Miss Katherine

Originating: Norfolk Lavender, Norfolk, England, 1992

Flower Appearance: pink

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 12–14 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

This is one of the lavender types with the darkest pink flowers.

Best Types of Lavenders for Humid Summers

‘Ana Luisa’

Ana-luisa-lavender

Originating: Van Hevelingen Herb Nursery, Newburg, Oregon, 1998

Flower Appearance: dark purple

Leaf Appearance: silver

Stem: 20–25 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 36–42 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 36–48 inches

Regional Zone: zones 7–10

This is one of the species’ biggest kinds, with tall stems and rounded blooms.

‘Kathleen Elizabeth’

Kathleen Elizabeth

also sold as ‘Silver Frost’

Originating: Van Hevelingen Herb Nursery, Newburg, Oregon, 1991

Flower Appearance: violet

Leaf Appearance: silver

Stem: 12–14 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 36–48 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 48 inches

Regional Zone: zones 7–10

This cross between Lavandula lanata and Lavandula angustifolia has dark violet blooms and delicate silver foliage that stays green all year, making it an excellent landscape plant.

‘Grosso’

Grosso-lavender

Originating: Pierre Grosso, Vaucluse District,

France, about 1972

Flower Appearance: purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 20–24 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 32–36 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

Like a hedgehog, the bloom habit of ‘Grosso’ makes an almost flawless 180-degree dome. The The flower spikes are slightly darker than those of ‘Fat Spike.’ This type contains the most oil. All lavenders, and more than 70% of lavender oil produced worldwide, come from ‘Grosso.’

‘Provence’

Provence-lavender

Originating: Alpenglow Gardens, North Surrey, British Columbia, mid-1950s

Flower Appearance: light purple

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 24–30 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 48–60 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 60–72 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Provence’ thrives in hot, dry summers. This cultivar is susceptible to fungal infections in humid climates and can become yellow over time. The stems do not dry well for dried bouquets since the lavender buds quickly come off.

‘Otto Quast’

Otto Quast

Originating: Homestead Gardens, Santa Rosa, California, 1980

Flower Appearance: plum

Leaf Appearance: moss green

Stem: 2–4 inches

Bloom: continuously starting in early spring

Height: 25–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30 inches

Regional Zone: zones 7–10

This variety is widely accessible at garden centers and is frequently grown from seed, rendering the actual strain uncertain. It features a dark plum flower head that lasts a long time with top bracts slightly lighter in color.

Best Cold Weather Types of Lavenders

‘Buena Vista’

Buena Vista

Originating: Donald Roberts, Premier Botanicals, Independence, Oregon, 1981

Flower Appearance: medium purple

Leaf Appearance: green

Stem: 10–12 inches

Bloom: continuously starting in spring

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Buena Vista’ is prized for its pleasant aroma. This continuous bloomer will cover your yard in lavender all summer and is an excellent culinary plant.

‘Folgate’

Folgate-lavender

Originating: Linn Chilvers, Norfolk, England, before 1933

Flower Appearance: light blue

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 8–10 inches

Bloom: once in early spring

Height: 30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Folgate’ blossoms look to be an almost iridescent periwinkle blue. ‘Folgate’ is well-known for its hardiness in colder regions.

‘Maillette’

Maillette

Originating: Monsieur Maillet, Valensole, France, before 1959

Flower Appearance: medium purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 10–12 inches

Bloom: once in spring

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

The angustifolia variety ‘Maillette’ is regarded as one of the best for oil distillation.

‘Royal Velvet’

Royal-velvet-lavender

Originating: Van Hevelingen Herb Nursery,Newburg, Oregon, 1980s

Flower Appearance: dark blue

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 12–14 inches

Bloom: twice starting in spring

Height: 24–30 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 30–36 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

One of the greatest types of fresh or dried bouquets is ‘Royal Velvet.’

Types of Lavenders with the Strongest Scent

‘Fat Spike’

Fat Spike

also sold as ‘Fat Spike Grosso’

Originating: Art Tucker, DeBaggio Nursery, Arlington, Virginia, early 1980s

Flower Appearance: light purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 16–20 inches

Bloom: twice starting in early summer

Height: 36–42 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 42 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Fat Spike’ is ideal for wands and sachets. The flower buds are densely filled with oil, and the aroma lingers.

‘Hidcote Giant’

Hidcote Giant

Originating: Major Lawrence Johnston, Hidcote Manor, Gloucester, England, before 1957

Flower Appearance: medium purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 24–30 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 36–42 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 42–48 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Hidcote Giant’ flower heads are enormously huge and fat. The aroma of the flowers is intense.

‘Super’

Lavender-Super

Originating: Etablissements Chiris, Grasse, France, around 1956

Flower Appearance: light purple

Leaf Appearance: gray-green

Stem: 18–20 inches

Bloom: once in early summer

Height: 48–52 inches

Recommended distance between plants: 60 inches

Regional Zone: zones 5–9

‘Super’ has a pleasant, clean aroma akin to Lavandula angustifolia and is frequently used in the manufacturing of oil.

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